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Fig Focaccia

Fig Focaccia

I know, I know. It’s the third fig recipe in a row I’ve posted, but I couldn’t help myself. Before figs disappear from the markets (or your fig tree), this is a recipe you have to try. It’s got that mixture of sweet and salty that’s so addictive, you’ll find yourself eating the whole pan, unless you share with friends and family. I made it for a first anniversary party of the artists’ coop I’m involved with, and it disappeared quicker than a popsicle on a hot day. The dough is the same as other focaccia post I’ve written — it’s a very shaggy dough and you leave it to rise overnight in the refrigerator.

The next day, you punch it down, then dump it onto a cookie sheet but don’t try to stretch it out immediately. Let it sit for a half hour or more, then spread it out, using fingers that have been dipped in olive oil.

It should look like this after it’s been rising for another hour or so.

Place the figs on top, gently pressing down, then scatter some kosher salt or coarse sea salt on top, plus some minced fresh rosemary.

Bake for about 20-30 minutes at 450 degrees and your house will smell divine.

To finish, drizzle a little honey over the whole thing.

I guarantee people will come back for seconds and thirds.

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Fig Focaccia
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • 1¼ oz. envelope dry active yeast (about 2¼ tsp.)
  • 2½ cups lukewarm water (from 105 degrees to 110 degrees)
  • 2 tsp. honey
  • 4-5 cups flour
  • 1 Tablespoon kosher salt or 5 teaspoons table salt
  • 6 Tbspns. extra-virgin olive oil
  • about two cups of figs, cut in half or quartered, if large
  • a few tablespoons minced rosemary
  • kosher or coarse sea salt
  • honey to drizzle at the end (about ¼ cup)
  • olive oil or butter to grease the pan
Instructions
  1. Put the yeast into the water and add the honey.
  2. Let it sit a few minutes to see if the yeast is active.
  3. It should start foaming slightly.
  4. Add the water mixture to four cups of flour and the salt, stirring with a spatula or wooden spoon.
  5. Keep adding more flour until you have a shaggy dough.
  6. Grease a large bowl with a couple of tablespoons of olive oil.
  7. Dump the dough into the bowl, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.
  8. Remove the dough from the bowl and dump onto a cookie sheet that's been generously greased with olive oil.
  9. Don't try to spread the dough out now.
  10. Let it rest for at least a half hour or more and it will be easier to spread out.
  11. Put some olive oil in a bowl, dip your fingers into it, and then dimple the dough all over using your fingers.
  12. Place the quartered figs on the dough, pressing down slightly.
  13. Scatter the kosher coarse or sea salt and rosemary on top.
  14. Bake for about 20-25 minutes at 450 degrees until brown.
  15. Remove from the oven and immediately drizzle with honey.
  16. Cut and serve.
 

This Post Has One Comment
  1. Wow. My mouth is watering. This reminds me so much of something my Aunt Carmen used to make when her figs got ripe. I’m going to give this a shot, although I’ll have to use store bought figs.

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